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Hundar Village to Hundar Dok
Hundar Village to Hundar Dok
Explore the jewel in the crown of drukpa lineage
Explore the jewel in the crown of drukpa lineage
Nubra: A Step Away From Paradise
Nubra: A Step Away From Paradise
Chamba Camp, Diskit to Diskit Monastery
Chamba Camp, Diskit to Diskit Monastery
River Rafting
River Rafting
Discover The Hidden Relics Of Thiksey Monastery
Discover The Hidden Relics Of Thiksey Monastery
Walk in the Footsteps of Buddha
Walk in the Footsteps of Buddha
Ladakh Archery
Ladakh Archery
Polo in India - Sport of Royals
Polo in India - Sport of Royals
Cycling Tour
Cycling Tour
Shanti Stupa
Shanti Stupa
Ancient Secrets of Nyerma -the Nunnery
Ancient Secrets of Nyerma -the Nunnery
Seance with the Spirits
Seance with the Spirits
Hiking Tour in Ladakh
Hiking Tour in Ladakh
Kohima Village
Kohima Village
Jakhama Village
Jakhama Village
Ladakh Bird Watching Tours
Ladakh Bird Watching Tours
Dudhwa National Park
Dudhwa National Park
Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary
Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary
Pilibhit Tiger Reserve
Pilibhit Tiger Reserve
Tharu Tribe
Tharu Tribe
birds-of-dudhwa-img-01
birds-of-dudhwa-img-02
Cycling in the Wilderness
Cycling in the Wilderness
Sharada River
Sharada River
Thanda Village Visit
Thanda Village Visit
Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary (Dudhwa Range)
Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary (Dudhwa Range)
legacy-dudhwa-national-park-img-01
legacy-dudhwa-national-park-img-02
Frog Temple
Frog Temple

Hundar Village to Hundar Dok

Altitude: 3560 m (11748 ft)

We start our walk from Hunder village to Hundar Dok, through the beautiful Hunder Gorge, Spending most of the time walking upstream alongside the Hundar stream and passing through Shepherds huts, where the men and women from Hundar village live with their Yaks, cows and sheep. They could be seen collecting milk, cheese, butter, wild vegetables and fuel for the winter.

Walking back to Hundar downstream till Hundar Bridge and monastery, the final descent through a valley of meadows and flower the walk will also have a great view of Saser Kangri Pear (7672 meters). Later visit Hundar monastery belonging to the Gelug-pa sect, set amidst innumerable chortens and has a huge impressive statue of Chamba in the main prayer hall. The gompa was built at the time King Jamgyal Namgyal came here with his wife Gyal Khatun. We also explore the village, which has some beautiful old houses.

 

Explore Hemis Monastery, The Jewel In The Crown Of The Drukpa Lineage

The Hemis Monastery, the largest monastic institution in Ladakh, is situated about 20 kilometres (1hr) from Thiksey. Built in a secluded valley, this monastery belongs to the Drukpa School or the Dragon Order of Mahayana Buddhism. It was established under the patronage of King Senge Namygal in the 13th century, and features beautiful statues and murals. At the Hemis Monastery, you’ll witness young lamas being taught various subjects, including literature, history, philosophy, yoga and tantra.

Discover Hemis Monastery and other centers of cultural and social significance while at our Chamba Camp in Thiksey.

 

Nubra: A Step Away From Paradise

Altitude: 3,144 meters (10,375 ft)

Diskit Village Walk: Self-exploratory or guided village walks or cycling through the village fields bordered with water channels as we make our way to the Yak Breeding Centre and Fishery. These units are vital to Nubra as it ensures a continuous supply of quality animal husbandry, winter after winter. We could then guide your way towards the main village boulevard, along the old mani walls (elongated,almost artfully arranged mounds of stones engraved with Buddhist prayers and mantras) and whitewashed chortens (dome-shaped monuments housing Buddhist relics) to experience the magic of this frontier town.

Diskit School Walk: Head towards the Lamdon Charitable School, which lies in the furlong of our Campsite. This school was established under the auspicious aegis of H.H.Dalai Lama on the 4th November, 1980. This school had a very humble beginning; Rev Lobzang Zotpa, lovingly also referred locally as “gyen lay“ instituted this school with only eight students. Today, Lamdon proudly attests to the fact that over 5,000 students have passed through its portal. Other than just imparting formal education, the school is also very instrumental in social works like cleanliness and sanitation of its immediate and fragile eco zone, preservation of its rich cultural legacies etc. Currently, the school houses over 150 students coming in from various far off places of the Nubra frontier. It’s an incredible experience to meet and understand the untold little stories of these amazing children.

Diskit Monastery Walking Tour: We drive you up towards the Diksit Gompa.Perched high on a hill in the village of Diskit and considered to be the oldest and largest Buddhist monastery in the Nubra Valley, Diskit Monastery belongs to the Gelugpa (Yellow Hat) sect of Tibetan Buddhism. It is a sub-gompa of the Thiksey monastery and has a statue of the Chorinpoche “the crowned Buddha” in the prayer hall, a huge drum and several images of fierce guardian deities. An elevated cupola of the monastery depicts a fresco of the Tashilhunpo Monastery of Tibet. We can even organize a special prayer high up near the towering Maitreya Buddha.

Hundar Sand Dunes: An adventurous ride on the double hump Bactrian camel on the high altitude cold desert to relive the glories of merchants, mercenaries and monks as they trudged these very sands in search of Gold, Glory and God. The sand dunes whisper lost stories of the bygone Great Game played out in these frontier wildernesses. Sip a brew of Darjeeling’s best, as you soak in the splendor of the past.

Option of driving to Chamba House, Hunder. You will be privy to an old heritage home which used to belong to a rich Silk Route era trader. His house walls and ceilings are filled with exotic wall frescos, evident of the Silk Route passing through these very landscapes. Also, do not miss seeing the peculiar statue of the Crying Buddha.

 

Chamba Camp, Diskit to Diskit Monastery

Altitude: 3590 m (11847 ft)

This morning, after breakfast, visit the main attraction here is Diskit Gonpa, or monastery, perched high above town on a craggy spur. You can drive up here but it’s a joy to walk among the mani walls (elongated, almost artfully arranged mounds of stones engraved with Buddhist prayers and mantras) and whitewashed chortens (dome-shaped monuments housing Buddhist relics).

A little network of paths and lanes weaves among the monks’ quarters and offices to a cluster of ancient prayer halls. If you arrive by dawn you can catch the daily morning prayers - chanting monks, crashing cymbals and deep horns. In another hall stands a famous statue of a protector deity brandishing the apparently mummified head and arm of a medieval Mongol soldier. Admittance to this particular hall is erratic. Footpaths climb up behind the monastery and past a ruined watchtower from which there are superb views of the Shyok Valley.

 

Indus Valley Rafting

The Indus River originates from sacred Mount Kailash and Lake Manasarovar in Tibet. It flows towards India and enters her borders through the region of Skardu in Baltistan. A gentle white-water rafting adventure on the Indus lets you float past some of the most scenic sights along the river. This includes breathtaking views of the canyons in the Ladakh and Zanskar Ranges, and the various monasteries and gompas along the river's banks. The splash of the icy-cold water against your face as you embrace the gentle Grade I and II rapids is an experience like no other. A sumptuous picnic lunch on the picturesque setting of the banks of the Indus is the best way to wrap up this fantastic rafting tour.

 

Discover The Hidden Relics Of Thiksey Monastery

Ladakh's Thiksey Monastery is located about a kilometre away from our camp. This beautiful monastery boasts spectacular views of the eastern Indus Valley, and is home to a two-storey statue of the Maitreya Buddha seated on a lotus. The monastery offers our guests the privilege of participating in a beautiful prayer ceremony, which takes place at sunrise. The prayer room at Thiksey Monastery features many handwritten and painted books, as well as a temple dedicated to the goddess Tara with her 21 images placed in glass-fronted wooden shelves. You will also see small shrines devoted to guardian divinities, including Cham-Sing, the protector deity of Thiksey.

 

Walk in the Footsteps of Buddha

With our excursion to Alchi in Ladakh, you can embark on an exploration of the monastic treasures of this ancient region. Driving through the picturesque landscape along the River Indus, you arrive at the fabled Alchi Monastery, which was built in the 11th century. Founded by Ringchen Zangpo, the Great Translator, the Alchi Gompa has a distinct Kashmiri influence in its art and architecture. Within the monastery you will see beautiful Tibetan- and Gandhara-style murals of Ladakh, and frescos and images of the Buddha. Enjoy a picnic lunch in a picturesque setting. On your way back from Alchi, you will pass by the Basgo fort, built in the 16th century. Basgo, literally 'Bull's Head' in the local language, was the centre of power and politics in this region, and houses a copper-gilt Buddha statue in one of its prayer halls. The ruins of the fort bear the horrific scars of the invasions of the Mongols.

 

Ladakhi Archery

Ladakhi warriors have used bows and arrows to protect themselves since the dawn of time. Those that inhabit this land still possess the art and skill involved in the sport of archery. The bows and arrows used are carved from bamboo, an exotic material, which is scarce in this barren region. The bow strings, on the other hand, are still made of rawhide, as they were thousands of years ago. Now mostly practised as a sport and as community entertainment, Ladakhi archery still brings out a great deal of local enthusiasm, and is an immense source of pride for its players and their villages.

 

Polo in India - the Sport of Royals

Polo originated in the Western Himalayas, in the kingdoms of Baltistan and Gilgit. King Singge Namgyal, whose mother was a Balti princess, was impressed with the thrill of the sport and introduced it to the region of Ladakh in the 17th century. Each team consists of six players and the game is fast and furious in this rugged terrain. The excitement builds as goals are struck by both sides; each goal accompanied by a burst of songs and music from the surna and daman, traditional Ladakhi musical instruments.

 

Ride with the Wind: Wari La

When in Ladakh, an early morning visit to Wari La is a must. One of the most scenic passes in Ladakh, Wari La is also the fourth-highest motorable road in the world. This pass connects two of the most exotic valleys in this trans-Himalayan region. Here you are rewarded with breathtaking views of the Nubra Valley, which lies beyond the pass, as well as the many villages that dot the Indus Valley. Wari La was opened only in 2008 as an alternative route into the Nubra Valley. Following a short safety briefing at the top, you'll be ready to cycle down the most extraordinary track that the Ladakhi Himalayas have to offer. The path criss-crosses its way down the mountainside into the green oasis of Sakti village. This exhilarating ride comes to an end at Kharu town.


Timeline Itinerary

1) Drive from Chamba Camp, Thiksey to Wari La Top
Altitute:5312 mtrs,17428 ft
Distance:52 Kms.
Time:02 hours drive time

2) Wari La Top to Lunch Stop
Distance:11 Kms.
Time:20 minutes drive time

3) Halt For Lunch
Altitute:4276 mtrs,14029 ft
Distance:52 Kms.
Time:1 ½ hours

4) Enjoy downhill mountain bike cycling from Kharu town through the picturesque hamlets of Takthok ,Sakti and Chemdey
Distance:26 Kms.
Time:1 ½ hours cycling

5) You also have an option to further cycle down from Kharu to Chamba Camp, Thiksey
Altitute:3550 mtrs,11647 ft
Distance:16 Kms.
Time:1 ½ hours cycling

Additional Services Included In This Optional Tour:

  • A back-up car at your service
  • The company of a knowledgeable guide throughout the tour
  • Choice of either packed or live picnic lunch
  • Appropriate safety cycling gears

 

Shanti Stupa & Leh Palace

During your stay at our camp, you'll have the opportunity to see some of the most important landmarks in the region, including the magnificent Leh Palace. Built by King Sengge Namgyal in the 17th century, the palace has nine storeys. Some parts of this palace are in ruins, while some sections display fine examples of Ladakhi architecture.

While in Ladakh, a visit to the Ladakh Arts & Media Organisation centre is a must. Housed in Munshi House, it is one of Leh's most important heritage houses. The view of the old city from the terrace of the Munshi House is a sight that should not be missed, and a cup of special Ladakhi tea with light snacks makes this experience even better.

Shanti Stupa, perched atop a magnificent vantage point over Leh, is an equally fascinating attraction. This Buddhist stupa with a stunning white-dome, also known as a chorten, offers panoramic views of the surrounding boulder-strewn landscape. Built to promote world peace and to commemorate 2,500 years of Buddhism, Shanti Stupa looks especially stunning when it is lit up at night.

 

Ancient Secrets of Nyerma -the Nunnery

The Nunnery at Nyerma, close to the TUTC camp, houses a school for a community of Buddhist nuns. It was established under the aegis of the present Khenpo Rinpoche of Thiksey, and is home to approximately 25 nuns from various parts of Ladakh, ranging in age from 11 to 87 years old. They practise meditation, study Buddhist philosophy and adhere to monastic practices. The nunnery is located within the precincts of the rich, ancient temple complex, founded by the Rinchen Zangpo, known as the Great Translator.

Evidence from the ruins that surround the nunnery suggests an ancient regional learning centre for Buddhist philosophical studies dating back to the 11th century. A peek into the stupas will give you a glimpse of some very special Buddhist paintings from a bygone era.

The village of Nyerma is also a mini-oasis in which many regional flora and fauna flourish. Here you'll get to learn about various indigenous herbs and plants used for medicines and cooking. Thiksey is one of the few Ladakhi villages that actually sits on the flat valley floor. The local community have taken to making mud bricks the traditional way, which is a fun thing to experience first-hand.

 

Seance with the Spirits

Buddhists are firm believers in the influence of the spirits on the material world. This influence is taken into consideration before any new venture or important activity is initiated. The lamas associated with the monasteries play the key role of mediator between the world of the humans and that of the spirits. Not only do they perform the rites necessary to appease the gods, they also take on the role of astrologers and oracles who can predict an auspicious time to start work. Whether it's for ploughing fields, picking the harvest, arranging a marriage or going on a journey, the lamas are consulted on almost everything.

In addition to a Seance Session with the Spirits, many other intriguing experiences can be enjoyed at TUTC.

 

Hiking Tour in Ladakh

The perfect hiking tour lets you experience the natural, rural and cultural treasures of a destination, without compromising on comfort. At TUTC, we have easy camp orientation walks, hikes to nearby nunneries, walks that take you over almost lunar landscapes and the many oases of happiness that are the hamlets of the valley. No matter what kind of adventure you prefer, Ladakh will not disappoint.

 

Hornbill festival

The Hornbill Festival is an annual feast for the senses, when the 16 Naga tribes come together to put on a stunning showcase of the unique sights, sounds, tastes and experiences of the region.

The 10-day long festival is held in December each year in the model village of Kisama. The beautiful venue, built into the steep slope of a mountainside, is about 12 kilometres from the state capital and a 20-minute drive from our camp.

Thousands of curious travellers from around the world gather here to enjoy a variety of colourful performances, local crafts, indigenous sports and fascinating foods. Each day the festival invites you to sample from a smorgasbord of diverse experiences, ranging from traditional archery contests and chilli-eating competitions, to dancing and monolith pulling, to blues gigs and a nightly bazaar.

The most wondrous thing about the Hornbill is the insight it provides into the great Naga tribal traditions. Overlooking the festival venue are sixteen traditional morungs, or youth dormitories, each built in the individual style and traditions of the tribes. The morungs provide guests with a unique opportunity to sit down with the tribespeople and be transported into their world. Don't be surprised to find yourself in the audience for an old tribal warrior as he regales visitors with tales of a time when headhunting was a regular affair.

The heritage complex of Kisama also houses a food court, a traditional bamboo hall and a wonderful World War II museum.

 

Khonoma Village

Khonoma is a 700-year-old village inhabited by the Angami tribe, whose men are renowned for their bravery and martial acumen. The Angamis etched their names into the history of the Indian resistance to Britain by bravely defending their territory against advancing British troops between the 1830s and the 1880s, when a peace was finally brokered.

The village is known for its lush surrounding forests, and for having some of the oldest terraced paddy fields in the region. The forests are home to a wide variety of plants, trees, birds and animals, including many rare and endangered species.

A close bond with nature is an unquestioned part of the local way of life. Faced with widespread deforestation, the residents banned hunting and logging in their forests. Today, the cobbled streets of Khonoma stand as a reminder of a time when man and nature flourished in peaceful coexistence.

 

Jakhama Village

Another excellent showcase of the multifaceted Naga way of life is Jakhama village. Our tour here begins at a kharu, or a large ceremonial gate, and takes us through traditional kitchens where one can sample khie - the local rice beer.

Our walk through Jakhama takes you through paddy fields, and the riverbanks where you can watch the Angamis fish and farm in their traditional ways, as they have done for hundreds of generations. As we weave through the village, we stop at local pigsties, fisheries and even a snail farm.

We will also get to see walls of houses riddled with bullet marks from World War II. Jakhama also houses a temporary education centre established by the Japanese during their attempted invasion. End the day sipping tea in a field overlooking this wonderful village.

 

Ladakh Bird Watching Tours

Wake up to bird song, and step out early in the morning with a naturalist for company. As you walk along the River Indus, you’ll spot a variety of India’s rare migrant birds. This includes sea buckthorn shrubs, the White Winged Redstarts and the Black-Throated Thrushes. You might even catch a glimpse of the Rosefinch, Yellow Citrin and the Magpie. Located in close proximity to the Chamba Camp in Thiksey, this place is a haven for all those interested in bird photography. A hamper breakfast on the banks of the River Indus is the perfect way to end this delightful morning.

 

Supplementary Cost (Per vehicle for tour package)

Supplement for tour excursions , including safari on exclusive basis (per vehicle for the entire package based on one to four persons travelling together)

 

Supplementary Cost (Per vehicle for tour package)

Supplement for tour excursions , including safari on exclusive basis (per vehicle for the entire package based on one to four persons travelling together)

 

Supplementary Cost (Per vehicle for tour package)

Supplement for tour excursions , including safari on exclusive basis (per vehicle for the entire package based on one to four persons travelling together)

 

Dudhwa National Park

Nestled on the border of India and Nepal, sprawling across 490 square kilometres in the remote hinterlands of Uttar Pradesh is the densely forested Dudhwa National Park. Home to some of the most exotic wildlife including elephants, Barasingha deer, the single-horned rhino, Indian narrow-headed soft-shell turtle and a vast array of birdlife, the national park is a delightful oasis for nature enthusiasts. The thick blanket of elephant grass, the enchanting tranquillity, only punctuated by the songs of birds or the myriad sounds of the wild allow one to experience the quintessential thrill of the jungle.

Accompanied by our expert naturalists, get introduced to the distinctive Terai ecosystem. With the rivers Mohan and Suheli as the markers on the northern and southern boundaries, and a few Tharu villages at the edges of the mysterious woodland, Dudhwa National Park makes for a fascinating experience for all wildlife enthusiasts and birdwatchers.

 

Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary

Sprawled across 400 square kilometres, and sharing an international border with Nepal, Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary was established in 1976 to protect its gharial, or Indian crocodile population. The swampy Terai ecosystem of Katarniaghat, with its soft alluvial savannah and the magnificent Girwa River is home to a myriad of wildlife and bird inhabitants. Many endangered species including the tiger, one-horned rhinoceros, Gangetic dolphin, swamp deer, Bengal florican, the white-backed and long-billed vulture, and over 350 varieties of resident and migratory birds find safe haven here. The exquisite boat rides on the river will offer a deep insight and uninterrupted views of the banks and glimpses of the gharials and other regional fauna.

 

Pilibhit Tiger Reserve

The dense woodlands of Philibit, interspersed with enormous meadows and with the rivers Sharada and Ghaghara as its boundaries, is among the most thickly forested areas in the Terai. The huge Sharda Sagar Dam serves as a wonderful vantage point to watch the rich avian life. The reserve spreads across an area of 730 square kilometres covered with sal, teak, sheesham, banyan and mango trees, and serves as home to four species of deer, as well as antelope, tigers, the Bengal florican, the great Indian hornbill and langur monkeys. A game drive here is an exciting chance to see the rich flora and fauna of the region along with a forest lodge, canals and bridges built during the British era.

 

A day in the life of the Tharu Tribe

Begin your day with a 40-kilometre drive to a small village sitting strategically on the periphery of the Indo-Nepal border - a rustic hamlet belonging to the dominant tribe of the Terai region. For centuries the Tharu have lived closely with the jungle and their traditions reflect their intimate relationship with the natural world.

Though their main occupation is farming, the colourful tribal community is renowned for their folk roots in music and dance, expert craftsmanship and their impeccable hunting skills. The Tharu excel at the art of catching and training wild elephants and making the best mahouts. Meet your local host for the day, who has previously served as an apprentice to the grand old man of Terai, renowned Indian naturalist Billy Arjan Singh. Spend the day in his intricately designed traditional home, with a captivating introduction to the culture and customs of this prolific community. Witness the warm hospitality of these people as you savour delicious Tharu cuisine after a cooking demonstration given by the ladies of the house.

Afterwards, you will have an exclusive interaction session with the 'dancing boys' - the popular custom of young boys being trained in the art of dance and music, dressed as women, in colourful costumes. Continue with a visit to a local women's association that is dedicated to the cause of employment and welfare to countless Tharu women. Enjoy a cup of tea while interacting with the ladies. Later, stroll through colourful local markets where you can see fresh produce being sold, alongside indigenous jewellery and other goods.

 

Birds of Dudhwa

Whether you are a seasoned bird watcher, or simply curious, Jaagir Lodge is the perfect spot to indulge yourself in the hobby of bird watching. Home to over 400 species of birds, both resident and migratory, the region is as popular for its birds as it is for its tigers. You may choose to walk, cycle or enjoy a drive, to explore the area sprinkled with streams, ponds, brooks, grassland and fields.

Scouring the landscape, you can chance upon species like the drongos, silver-bill munia, baya weaver, cattle egret, cinnamon bittern, kingfishers, falcons, kites, owls and pheasant-tailed jacana. The wetlands, marsh and swamps also provide prime habitat for many attractive birds like the pied kingfisher, bitterns, the purple swamp-hen and the Eurasian thick-knee. Board a small canoe which will let you admire the birds and animals from close quarters, followed by a picnic lunch.

Note: Guests have the option of selecting from the various available trails.

 

Cycling in the Wilderness

Embark on a bicycle tour through farm fields and tiny villages on the periphery of Dudhwa National Park. Your accompanying resident naturalist will assist you in spotting the birds in the area and provide an introduction to the culture, traditions and legends of the region. Just two kilometres away from the lodge is a small river, which is a perfect habitat for waders, kingfishers and other species of birds. It is also a great opportunity to meet the friendly locals and see the homes of farmers, decorated with age-old motifs and designs of tribal art. Pass through a perfect rural setting on meandering roads, with local Tharu Villages, ladies wearing their colourful attire and farmers singing while working in their fields.

Note: Guests have the option of selecting from the various available routes.

 

A Birdwatcher's Delight: Sharada River

Today, you will explore the banks of the River Sharda, which introduces you to Dudhwa's wealth of endemic and migratory bird life. Every winter, Sharda witnesses an annual migration, a true spectacle of nature, where thousands of bar-headed geese, shell drakes, pochards and tufted ducks, visit the flood plains, making it their annual wintering and breeding ground. Traverse through remote villages, which give way to a thrilling, off-road experience, to arrive at the breath-taking waterscape. Witness local fishermen leading nomadic lives and stop for a brief chat with animal herders, who readily share their space with wild animals like tigers, leopards and wolves. Conclude the experience by witnessing one of the most spectacular sunsets with refreshing sundowners.

 

Tanda Village Visit with an Exclusive Safari in the Maillani Forest

Embark on an excursion to the charming rural environs of Tanda village, a vibrant hamlet occupied by a handful of families, located in the core of Kishanpur Tiger Reserve. Learn about the thrilling aspects of man-animal conflicts; living without electricity, schools or even hospitals, yet being self-sustainable - harvesting their own food, curing their illnesses and worshipping the forest gods.

After a fascinating village visit, proceed to the Maillani forest on an exclusive game drive, accompanied by your naturalist. Off the beaten path, this magnificent range is primarily dominated by miles of sal forest, interspersed with glorious examples of local flora like the flame of the forest and the silk cotton tree. Also, in a sacred grove, is an ancient shrine of a Hindu saint, covered by a million tinkling bells. The area offers prized sightings of the leopard and is excellent for bird watching. With an abundance of forest species such as woodpeckers, hornbills, colourful pigeons and the elusive emerald dove flashing its vivid plumage, it serves up an astonishingly vivid visual treat.

 

Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary

Located 30 kilometres from the Dudhwa National Park with a stretch of agricultural land breaking the forested continuity is the Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary. Spread across 203 square kilometres, this sanctuary, like Dudhwa, is dense, riparian and covered with deciduous trees like sal, teak and jamun. The tiger, chital, hog deer, wild boars, otters and many more animals find themselves a home here. A huge number of resident and migratory birds like falcons, drongos, owls, egrets and peacocks can be spotted in the open meadows, which is traversed by perennial streams.

 

Tiger Haven and the Legacy of Dudhwa National Park

Learn about the history of Dudhwa National Park, which is not only a haven for tigers but also many other species which are on the brink of extinction elsewhere. Focus on the legendary soul, Billy Arjan Singh, who envisioned creating a cradle of nature here, to provide perfect conditions for endangered species to thrive, helping them flourish in their natural habitat.

Experience the legacy of Billy Arjan Singh, who lived and fought for these forests, and whose legacy remains for future generations to be inspired and encouraged. Your accompanying specialist will throw light on the life and times of Singh, who was an Indian hunter-turned-conservationist, and a prolific writer who authored numerous books. He was the first to reintroduce tigers and leopards from captivity into the wild. Today, Tiger Haven, his estate, serves as an education centre for local children from villages situated on the fringes of the national park. His home has been converted into a museum and the area is itself an extension of the Dudhwa National Park, serving as an ideal habitat for birds and mammals.

 

The Frog Temple of Oel

Set out for the 19th century Frog Temple at Oel, situated about a two-hour drive southeast of Jaagir Lodge. According to tantric doctrines of Hinduism, frogs represent fertility, prosperity and good fortune. Legend has it that the temple at Oel was commissioned by Hindu Maharaja Bakhat Singh as a mark of reverence for the celestial frog, who blessed him with good fortune and prosperity. Learn from your guide why animals are an integral part of the pantheon of gods, as you marvel at the architecture, murals and figurines of Hindu mythological characters.

Note: Guests on a long stay may choose to do the excursion as a day trip from the lodge. Guests on a short stay may opt for this excursion enroute to Lucknow.

 
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